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Helping your children
have a good night’s sleep

You are not alone with your kids’ sleep issues
The Sleep Cottage is here to support you


Good night’s sleep means,
well-rested happier kids and parents alike!

Parents often think that sleep issues in children are just a normal part of the growing up process. But that’s not necessarily true. Many sleep problems can be diagnosed and solved through a sleep study and a follow-up treatment plan. A sleep study conducted overnight in a dedicated sleep lab is considered the golden standard when it comes to examining children’s breathing abnormalities during sleep. After a sleepless night, kids tend to be grumpy, sleepy and easily irritable. At times, they may become aggressive, face learning difficulties, suffer from attention deficit, hyperactivity or other behavioral problems.


Your child’s wellbeing and future depend on sleeping well.

More than just difficult nights

After a sleepless night, kids tend to be grumpy, sleepy and easily irritable. At times, they may become aggressive, face learning difficulties, suffer from attention deficit, hyperactivity or other behavioral problems.

Your child’s well being and future depend on sleeping well

Sleep problems in childhood may also impact children later in life by affecting their development, decreasing learning abilities, resulting in insomnia or cardiovascular issues like high blood pressure and heart problems. If you are worried about your child’s sleep issues or behavioral problems, it’s never too early to see a sleep specialist. The youngest patient The Sleep Cottage cared for was just 2 weeks old!


Sleeping disorders

In child patients, most common types of sleep disorders include:

Snoring: Caused by vibrations created in the throat when airway muscles get too relaxed during the sleep, resulting in noise when the air is breathed in and out.

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA): Series of short episodes lasting a few seconds when breathing stops or is reduced during the sleep due to upper airway blockage.

Nocturnal waking: Becoming awake in the middle of the night followed by significant problems with getting back to sleep during night-time.

Excessive daytime sleepiness: Persistent sleepiness and lack of energy despite getting enough sleep that may lead to falling asleep at unsuitable times (e.g. during conversation or a meal).

Abnormalities in the control of breathing: Disturbed ventilation and breathing patterns when asleep or awake that may cause e.g. increased levels of carbon dioxide in the blood (hypoventilation).

Our Paediatric Sleep Specialist

Dr Virginia Oliveira

Dr Oliveira specialises in several types of sleep disorders in children. She also has particular interest in sleep disorders related to behavioural and developmental issues, such as ADHD and autism.